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Arriving to find that Room 1 hadn’t quite reached full capacity, meaning there was space enough to slip down the side of the crowd and whittle a way to the front, seemed lucky enough. However, it was luckier still to have ‘front row seats’ to Flume’s ambient, psychedelic set. Working the crowd with feel-good synths and heavy bass kicks, the Australian DJ dropped some of his best tunes.  ‘Holdin On‘ got the crowd rocking back and forth with its incomprehensible chorus – which most Flume fans would hazard a guess to involve the words “I’m a hip-shaking llama, I love you” or “pimp shaking mama, I lost you” (take your pick).

His remix of Ta-Ku’s ‘Higher’ forced similar, but more serene ripples across the crowd, with his backdrop offering kaleidoscopic scenery. Atmospherically this number created a chill equal to the personality of the man himself, as the room’s attendants bopped along in sync. The follow up to this was his remix of Hermitude’s hip hop classic from last year, ‘HyperParadise‘, which allowed him to end his set with a certain catharsis. Urging the crowd to get hyped in the build up, before dropping his bassy rendition of the chorus, Flume certainly went out with a WHP-worthy goodbye.

Dusky lived up to their name as their arrival brought about a darker tone to the room. Their minimalist light displays enlisted momentary flashes which reminded everyone where they were, and it worked. So well. Serving a complimentary and mysterious mixture of deep house sounds with techno overlaps, the warehouse was shaken under their interludal storm in the lead up to the headline act. Not only relying on their more reputable tracks such as ‘Nobody Else and ‘Careless‘, Dusky put in a performance that brought out a real contemporary, underground edge, giving the warehouse-goers a taste of what they came for.

The London duo gave way to a rampant introduction by Disclosure, donning an impressive combination of heavy bass and hyperactive lighting throughout the prelude. With the crowd in their palms, heartbeats raised, the two brothers dropped this year’s big names – ‘F For You‘, ‘White Noise‘, ‘Voices‘, ‘You & Me’ and of course, ‘Latch‘. It was surprising almost, knowing that Flume had rather successfully remixed ‘You & Me’, to find that they didn’t share the stage at all. Sam Smith and Sasha Keable did feature for their respective collaborations, but this seemed to only work up the front four rows, which were given something to Instagram whilst singing along to the headline’s highly anticipated tracks.

However, Disclosure’s convincingly integrated pop vocals to their synthy bass lines worked wonderfully in their favour when getting the crowd more involved.  ‘F For You’’s rhythmic verses and punchy chorus had “because I played the fool for ya’” chanted across the vicinity, closely followed by ‘White Noise’ which had the room lit only by a fluorescent blue stage and the iconic diamond filling the backdrop, before landing an energetic drop which brought the whole place to life. By this point, you could tell the “I sing to Radio 1 in front of my mirror with a hairbrush every morning” sort, were itching to hear the duo’s most in-demand number. Disclosure delivered. The tone quietened with a soft beat to keep the crowd at bay as Guy Lawrence gave his thanks and announced “We’re going to play one more song” which triggered the upsurge. They ended with an eruptive performance of ‘Latch’ generating a synchronised sing-along with the technical display to match – not recommended for those who are over particularly photosensitive.

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