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Circulation Symbol

In the final song of Trus’me’s latest album, he samples dialogue from the film Le Grand Bleu, about a diver with almost dolphin-like talents whose love is torn between earth and sea.  It seems that Trus’me is facing a similar dichotomy – the man has such a natural flair for house and boogie but seems determined to root himself in grittier techno sounds.  Treat Me Right isn’t as disastrous as a dolphin trying to walk on land; it’s just not what the Mancunian producer does best.

‘T’es Un Pute’, ‘I Want You’ and ‘Somebody’ are distinctly techno in their pace and punchy bass (the latter positively throbs) and thrive on interesting sample choices – French dialogue, American Gangster quotes, bustling crowds of people and something akin to helicopter rotor blades.  The tracks do have merit in themselves – ‘I Want You’ should certainly and hopefully be found in this year’s late night sets – but they are far overshadowed by the less boisterous numbers on the album.  Opening track ‘Hindsight’ is set against a spacey, swooning backdrop and uses vintage vocal samples that sound almost like a soft motorbike growl.  ‘Moonlight Kiss’ bubbles over with house drum beats, trickling water samples and a far deeper sound.  The album ends on a high with ‘Long Distance’ – a swaggering hip hop beat with quiet cinematic synths.  If Trus’me would only re-immerse himself in these sounds he could be gliding through the ocean with ease.

Really though, artists rarely chase ease, and I’m sure dolphins sometimes just fancy a stroll on the beach.  Yes, this album is no Working Night$, but it’s difficult to begrudge Trus’me for his experimentation.  He has been around the world and back in the last few years, and now returns to a hometown notorious for its rich musical variety.  Only a fool wouldn’t want to dabble in all that’s on offer.

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